Building Community At America's Table

Books

Here’s our growing list of food system writing from both sides of the “agricultural divide”, complete with our mini-book reports:

The Raw Milk Revolution“  David Gumpert — A balanced, journalistic look at raw milk,  Gumpert throws into question whether raw milk is “inherently dangerous” and shows that something besides safety is driving regulatory agencies like the FDA to demonize raw milk and terrorize dairy farmers.  Millions of consumers drink raw milk every day.  Millions more want it.  Why can’t they get it?  Even if you have no particular interest in drinking raw milk yourself, this is a book that will show you how misguided our food regulatory agencies are.  Apply the same thinking to genetically modified foods.  To allowing pesticides into our foods.  To allowing bleaching and irradiating of our foods.  Same agencies. (Grant)

The Town That Food Saved”  Ben Hewitt — The small town of Hardwick, VT is cast as a town being reborn through its commitment to a local food economy.  But is it that simple?  Hewitt digs below the surface in this book, asking tough questions about “community” and “local”.  This is truly eye-opening for anyone interested in the shape our new food economy – there is much to be learned in Hardwick!  (more of my reaction to the book here:  How Big Is Small?) (Grant)

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What we’re reading now:

Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly by James McWilliams (Grant)

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And here are books on our to-read list:

Safe Food by Marion Nestle

Please use the comments section to suggest further books we should read!

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2 responses

  1. Perhaps you’d like to borrow the copy of Stolen Harvest I was able to score at a garage sale recently. I first heard the author, Vandana Shiva, on NPR several years ago and have kept this book on my “to read” list for years. Of the many issues raised when the topic of GM foods comes up, Dr. Shiva is trying to combat the threats to traditional agricultural practices such as seed saving. Without the ability to save seeds, biodiversity is lost and subsistence farmers become completely dependent on transnationals like Monsanto. What we are doing with the food supply in this country is being replicated all over the world.

    June 20, 2012 at 1:01 pm

    • Thanks Linda! It is clearly a book I need to get to – can’t seem to read fast enough lately and am behind so I’ll circle back for the loan later. For you and others reading, Vandana Shiva will be speaking in Chicago at the Bioneers conference in early November, so mark your calendar!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:57 pm

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